International Worker’s Day!

Some rights reserved by hughillustration. From Flickr.

Ivy: Homeless in San Francisco – a YA novel

In this empathetic tale of hope, understanding, and the importance of family, readers face the difficult issue of poverty and the many hardships of being homeless through an inspiring young heroine named Ivy. Ivy is the story of a young girl who finds herself homeless on the streets of San Francisco when she and her father, Poppy, are evicted from his artist loft.

Struggling to survive day to day, Ivy and Poppy befriend a dog who takes them to the ramshackle home of quirky siblings Eugenia and Oscar Orr, marking the start of some amazing adventures. Blending a spoonful of Charles Dickens’ Oliver Twist with a dash of Armistead Maupin’s Tales of the City and a few pinches of the Adventures of Lassie, Ivy’s tale will appeal to young readers as well as give adults material to discuss with children.

“Lolitas, Oliver Twists and Huckleberry Finns live on, and now, Ivy’s tale of hope lives right alongside them.” —Robin Clewly, San Francisco Chronicle

Available from PM Press, Powell’s or Amazon.com.

An Alternative to Amazon.com’s Occupy Hoodie

 As an alternative to the #Occupy hoodie from Amazon.com that I wrote about previously

(Image from Not All Occupy Protestors Are Anarchists; Just the Cool Ones | Neon Tommy.)

Just take your basic black hoodie – bought from some nice, non-corporate capitalist exploiter and not made in a sweatshop (and when you find that shop let me know) – and then tape any slogan you want to it.

You’ll still run the risk of being shot, beaten or pepper-sprayed, but you won’t have contributed to Amazon.com’s bottom line along the way.

On the other hand, there’s still this…

Frank Kozik limited edtion black Anarchy Cat Qee 8″ vinyl figure

Montreal Anarchist Bookfair – May 19-20, 2012

MONTREAL ANARCHIST BOOKFAIR 2012

Two days: Saturday, May 19 & Sunday, May 20
10am-5pm on both days

The Anarchist Bookfair will take place in two buildings across from each other in Parc Vinet, a short walk from Lionel-Groulx metro:
– Centre d’éducation populaire de la Petite-Bourgogne et de St-Henri (CEDA), 2515 rue Delisle
– Centre Culturel Georges-Vanier (CCGV), 2450 rue Workman

Anarchist Bookfair » The Montreal Anarchist Bookfair will be May 19-20 at two buildings in Parc Vinet (CEDA & CCGV).

Occupy Wall Street Hoodie

This will get you shot in Florida, beaten by the cops in NYC and pepper-sprayed on University of California campuses…

The Occupy Wall Street hoodie — guaranteed to get you fucked up by some asshole somewhere. But stylish and warm.

(And buying it from Amazon.com won’t be buying into the same system as Wall Street. Not at all.)

Upcoming Conference: From Rebellion to Revolution: Dynamics of Political Change

From Rebellion to Revolution: Dynamics of Political Change
16th Berlin Roundtables on Transnationality, October 17 – 20, 2012, WZB

The Irmgard Coninx Foundation, a non-profit-organization founded in Munich in 2001, organizes an annual Roundtable on Transnationality, held in Berlin. The Roundtables provide a forum for international young academics and journalists to discuss the political and social challenges facing a global civil society. This year’s Roundtable is “From Rebellion to Revolution: Dynamics of Political Change”

The recent waves of protests and demonstrations in many countries around the world have reintroduced the question of revolution and grass-roots system change to the political and scholarly agenda. Whether it is the fight against autocratic and corrupt regimes or protests against market-driven politics, in many of these cases revolution is in the air or already on the streets. Against this background, the 16th Berlin Roundtables on Transnationality want to examine the dynamics of political (and often violent) unrest that lead to, or at least aims at, fundamental structural transformations of political regimes and alterations in power relations between the masses and the elites. Our key questions are: Who makes revolutions and why? What influences the emergence and course of revolutionary situations? What the immediate and long term outcomes? And what are successful modes of transformations to more democracy? (via Irmgard Coninx Stiftung: Revolutions.)

A detailed background paper on the conference and its themes is available.

They are looking for participants who are younger academics (max. up to 5 years after PhD) or activists/practitioners (eg workers in governmental or urban services, NGOs, journalists). I’m not sure if it is exactly what they had in mind, but I would think they’d be interested in people in Black Bloc groups or actively involve in significant Occupy movements.

Those interested in participating are invented to submit a paper (max. 3500 words max), an abstract (max. 300 words), a narrative biography and a CV. Submission deadline is June 30, 2012. Co-authored and already published papers will not be accepted. There is an online submission process.

Based on a review of submissions, approximately 45 applicants will be invited to participate in the conference with peers and prominent scholars in Berlin. The Irmgard Coninx Foundation will cover travel to and accommodation in Berlin.

Nancy Fraser will be giving evening lectures as part of the conference. Fraser is the Henry A. and Louise Loeb Professor of Political and Social Science and professor of philosophy at The New School in New York City. She has written extensively on social theory, gender, Foucault, etc., with a focus on issues of justice. (I would love to hear her talks.)

Stunning Poster Art from Indonesia – #Occupy Jakarta

Earlier today, @OccupyWallStNYC tweeted: “Corporations are organized across borders. It’s time for the 99% to get organized GLOBALLY.” But in fact the Occupy movement went global pretty much as soon as it began.

One of the more powerful expressions of the internationalized Occupy movement has been coming out of Indonesia, where Nobodycorp. Internationale Unlimited is producing an amazing range of political poster art. One of the most striking things about these posters is their intensity. The Occupy movement in Jakarta is grappling not just with underwater mortgages and layoffs, but with military violence and murder, with the problems of Muslim terrorism and with breakaway movements in places like Aceh.

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For more…

Rebel Cities by David Harvey

Rebel Cities: From the Right to the City to the Urban Revolution
by David Harvey

Manifesto on the urban commons from the acclaimed theorist.

Long before the Occupy movement, modern cities had already become the central sites of revolutionary politics, where the deeper currents of social and political change rise to the surface. Consequently, cities have been the subject of much utopian thinking. But at the same time they are also the centers of capital accumulation and the frontline for struggles over who controls access to urban resources and who dictates the quality and organization of daily life. Is it the financiers and developers, or the people?

Rebel Cities places the city at the heart of both capital and class struggles, looking at locations ranging from Johannesburg to Mumbai, and from New York City to São Paulo. Drawing on the Paris Commune as well as Occupy Wall Street and the London Riots, Harvey asks how cities might be reorganized in more socially just and ecologically sane ways—and how they can become the focus for anti-capitalist resistance. (via VersoBooks.com.)

Spring has Sprung, May Day is Coming #M1GS

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journaloftheendtimes

I participate in Occupy DC, but I’ve watched New York’s occupation only in the media, so I’ve seen them the way the media sees all of us. They mass and they march, menacingly unified, and clearly “anti” everything, or a lot of things. But who are they? And what exactly are they doing? News reports about the occupy movement answer these questions badly, making protesters incomprehensible even to sympathizers.

Colin Moynihan writing for The New York Times City Room Blog about Saturday’s Occupy Wall Street march and the subsequent arrests and violence is a perfect example. The details reported could hardly make the protesters seem more victimized. Occupiers are shoved, beaten, and arrested, with no better justification given than the need to keep things orderly.

Still, there’s disbelief that police could dish out violence without any cause. We hear from occupiers mostly after they’ve been victimized, but who can trust…

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Reel Girl’s got it going on as usual: one of the canniest writers on gender and popular culture in the blogosphere.

Reel Girl

So after I posted about sexualizing M & M’s, (I cannot even believe I have to write that, but alas, I do) I got some comments about Ms. Brown being a feminist. She’s wearing glasses, is a business executive, and Tweets empowering messages about women.

Here’s the problem: Besides the glasses and gloves, all Ms. Brown is wearing is her pumps. The main difference between male M & Ms and female M & Ms appears to be shoes. Many kids who are looking at these pictures can’t read. Put Ms. Brown in sneakers so she can walk and run like the others, and then we can talk about her backstory.

But, because I am 43 years old and can read and use a computer, I went to M & Ms FB page today to read up on Ms. Brown. Here is the first things I saw:

The boys tell…

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Every nuclear explosion 1945-1998

“Japanese artist Isao Hashimoto has created a beautiful, undeniably scary time-lapse map of the 2053 nuclear explosions which have taken place between 1945 and 1998, beginning with the Manhattan Project’s “Trinity” test near Los Alamos and concluding with Pakistan’s nuclear tests in May of 1998. This leaves out North Korea’s two alleged nuclear tests in this past decade (the legitimacy of both of which is not 100% clear).”

Free e-book: Class War? What Americans Really Think about Economic Inequality

Class War? What Americans Really Think about Economic Inequality
BENJAMIN I. PAGE AND LAWRENCE R. JACOBS
Published April 2009

“Class War? is the right question, and Page and Jacobs provide the right answer: Americans are more concerned about inequality and less divided over what should be done about it than the pundits presume. Everyone interested in America’s widening income gap—and everyone, including our leaders, should be—needs to read this book.”—Jacob S. Hacker

Get this e-book free from the University of Chicago Press – though you’ll have to use Adobe’s Digital Editions software to read it.

Pictures from #Occupy Oakland

There is a there there…

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(thanks to reddit/R/Anarchism)

There’s so much on the events and the scene at Occupy Oakland that it’s hard to know where to start in terms of links to more info, but you might begin with…

And for a view from the other side…

And for photos of earlier Oakland action, you can begin with…

And for the view from across the briny…

If you’re new to protests where the police may get frisky, you might be intimidated by the shields, gas masks, etc. – don’t be.  For one thing, there’s a nice new Instructable for DIY Gas Masks that should give you breathing room (pun intended) in many situations were tear gas or pepper spray is used.   Backpacks stuffed with padding can help protect your back from police batons, but you can also buy riot gear just like cops wear. (Though I might recommend body armor meant for snowboarders or dirt-bikers that you could wear under a hoodie as less… confrontational.)

A Soundtrack for Black History Month: How Fares the Dream?

It’s that time of year again: Black History Month — and below is my updated playlist/soundtrack for the civil rights and black power movements… But first a few remarks.

Black History Month: the one month of the year when, traditionally, American school children get to learn about George Washington Carver (our “black Leonardo”) and Booker T. Washington, and maybe if they’re lucky W. E. B. DuBois and Thurgood Marshall.

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